Tatsoi

Tatsoi
Tatsoi
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Introducing Tatsoi

Tatsoi (Brassica rapa) originates from Japan, where it has been cultivated since 500 A.D. This leafy green belongs to the cabbage family of Brassicas.

Growing

Location and Soil

Position your plants in full sun.

Tatsoi thrives in well-drained, sandy soils rich in nitrogen. It does well outdoors in raised beds.

Propagation

Growing from Seed

Plant seeds approx. 1cm deep and space them 3cm apart. Seeds will germinate in just 4 to 8 days. As they grow, thin them out to about 20cm apart.

Care

Fertilising 

Apply a rich compost or nitrogen rich fertiliser to the soil prior to planting.

Pruning / Harvesting

Remove damaged foliage from the plant as they appear. Leaves can still be harvested as you need them. However, the mustard flavour of tatsoi descends into bitterness as the plant reaches flowering. 

Growing in a pot
Watering

Water regularly, keeping soil moist but not waterlogged. Try to avoid watering the leaves as best you can, but this is not always possible.

Pests and Diseases

Common pests include slugs, cabbage worms, and flea beetles.

Mildew and fungus can be a problem. One tip is to space your plants far enough apart so they are not touching each other and to allow air flow between plants.

Eating the Fruit

Health Benefits

Tats is rich in beta carotene, and Vitamins A, C, and K as well as calcium, potassium, phosphorous, and iron.

Tatsoi with prawns
Tatsoi with prawns
Weight Loss

Leafy green such as Tatsoi are excellent for weight loss. They are low in sugar and carbohydrate and are filling at the same time.

Fibre

Tatsoi is an excellent source of dietary fibre. This non-digestible fibre promotes healthy bowel movements.

Immune System
Antioxidants
Prebiotics

Other Content

Tropical Gardening

By Rob Pyne

Quadriplegic, Former MP, Councillor & Political Campaigner: Rob is an Eco Socialist who shares ways to survive & fight capitalism. #socialism #championoftheunderdog Occupation: Online Editor Employer: Champion of the Underdog! Book: Struggle and Resistance in the Far North

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